March 25th, 2016       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

The reviews for “Eye in the Sky” are coming in and they are great. It has already received a certified fresh status on Rotten Tomatoes with 92% and an average rating of 7.3/10. Below is a selection of reviews on Helen’s performance. Fingers crossed the film will be doing well since its topic is still niche in regards of today’s cinema.


The Toronto Sun, March 24, 2016
Eye in the Sky is an edge-of-the-seat thriller based on realistic events and created out of equal parts tension and character. Helen Mirren is absolutely formidable as Colonel Powell.

Newsday, March 23, 2016
Because its central dilemma is somewhat limited, “Eye in the Sky” spins its wheels while countless politicians – worried more about bad press than about conscience – pass the buck and stall for time. That may not make for gripping drama, but it does lend the film a touch of realism.

The Austin Chronicle, March 24, 2016
The always reliable Mirren is UK-based Colonel Katherine Powell, in charge of a joint British and American drone program operating in the skies over a fictional Middle Eastern country. Eye in the Sky maintains nerve-racking suspense throughout its running time and explicates some of the unknown nuances of drone warfare. Plus, you know, Alan Rickman is reason enough to see it.

Toronto Star, March 24, 2016
This riveting drone thriller is contemporary edge-of-your seat stuff, propelled by a crack cast led by Helen Mirren as single-minded British Col. Katherine Powell. She’s determined to finally nab the radicalized Englishwoman she’s been tailing for six years, now finally located in a house in Kenya.

Roger Ebert.com, March 11, 2016
“Eye in the Sky” opens in a week that saw U.S. drone strikes reportedly kill 150 people in Somalia, a country with which the U.S. is not at war and against which Congress has authorized no military action. The deceased were of course reported to be “terrorists,” though, as with most recent such cases, there’s no independent verification of that. While Hood’s film says very little about American policy in this area, it does suggest that its terrible subject is likely to be with us for a long time to come. Helen Mirren, terrific as usual.

Entertainment Weekly, March 11, 2016
Mirren, her jaw set and her eyes telegraphing every moment of fury and impatience, is unsurprisingly great (if not entirely humanized by the script), and Aaron Paul has key scenes as the drone pilot who actually has to pull the trigger. (It’s also nice to see Barkhad Abdi, who’s been almost entirely AWOL since his Oscar-nominated turn in 2013’s Captain Phillips, in a substantial role as a local go-between). But it’s the late Alan Rickman, as Mirren’s superior, who steals it; swinging from the kind of dry-vermouth humor he always did so well to a quietly brutal final speech that feels like a punch to the solar plexus, he proves with every one of his brief moments onscreen just how much the movies will miss him.