Jul 16
2019

Multi award winning actress, Dame, legend – Grazia’s Joely Walker sat down with the inimitable Helen Mirren to talk diversity, Instagram and the ‘anti-ageing’ lingo she wishes would kindly jog one…

It’s the final day of the 72nd Cannes Film Festival and in a suite in the Hotel Martinez (where the A-list flock annually), we’re setting up for the arrival of a bona fide British legend – an actress with over five decades experience, 70-plus films under her belt and one of the few Brits to ever scoop up the elusive Triple Crown of Acting (winning an Academy Award, Emmy Award and Tony Award). But to everyone’s surprise (because, in this industry, being fashionably late is wholly expected), L’Oreal Paris Ambassador Dame Helen Mirren arrives on time and with little kerfuffle – no entourage in tow scribbling down convoluted coffee orders, no bodyguards sweeping the styling rail. Instead, just one manager and a laid-back outfit – her hands slouched casually in the pockets of her black Adidas tracksuit bottoms. All-in-all, an oddly serene set up for one of the most iconic British women in film – a testament to her no-fuss, no-fluff attitude. Indeed, fluff is something Helen simply cannot abide, especially when it comes to the cosmetics industry and the way, for decades, women were addressed with scaremongering terminology like the outdated ‘anti-ageing’ rhetoric. ‘How can a product be “anti-ageing”?’ questions Helen. ‘That’s like saying I’m anti-sun, well the sun is going to rise, “Well no, I’m anti it.” But thankfully – with the likes of Helen and many others speaking up on the subject, as well as brands taking note of changing customer expectation – the lingo has shifted as part of a wider sea change in the sector. ‘All of these fences have been slowly broken down. And I think what L’Oreal [Paris] have done is they’ve truly embraced it. They’ve incorporated different ages and genders, they’ve incorporated race, they’ve incorporated disabilities. A diverse, realistic representation of people – an authentic selection of who we all are. It’s why I’m proud to be an Ambassador.’ The complete artice can be read over at Grazia UK.

Related Media:

Photo Gallery – Editorial Photography – 2019 – Session 05

May 20
2019

The photo gallery has been updated with lots of additional pictures of Helen attending the Cannes Film Festival, including pictures from a new event – the HFPA & Participant Media’s Honour of Hep Refugees. Also added is a new cover story from the British Woman’s Weekly, May 21 issue. Enjoy the additions.



Related Media:

Photo Gallery – Magazine Scans – Woman’s Weekly (United Kingdom, May 21, 2019)
Photo Gallery – Public Appearances – 2019 – 72nd Cannes Film Festival – HFPA & Participant Honour Hep Refugees
Photo Gallery – Public Appearances – 2019 – 72nd Cannes Film Festival – Les Plus Belles Annees D’Une Vie Premiere

Apr 04
2019

There’s a wonderful lenghty interview with Helen Mirren in the UK Vogue’s Non-Issue, with Jane Fonda on the cover. Here’s an excerpt, the full article can be read over at Vogue: Helen Mirren walks into the Hôtel Regina in Paris with a steely resolve. Throwing off her tan cashmere coat amid the red-velvet grandeur of the Bar Anglais, she reveals a delicate crimson top then runs a hand through her burnished silver hair. A small tattoo – two interlocking Vs at the base of her thumb, a reminder to “love thy neighbour” and the result of a drunken night out with a Native American theatre group some years ago – is just visible below the hem of her left sleeve. She is perfectly windswept. Mirren is not L’Oréal Paris’s oldest ambassador (that honour goes to Jane Fonda), but she is definitely its most frank. “I was stuck in the damn tunnel,” she explains of her slight tardiness, her crackling azure eyes on full beam. “I told the driver, ‘Fuck it, I’ll walk!’” By her own admission, the Academy Award winner tends to “swear like a potty-mouthed sailor”, and hearing Mirren swear is surely one of the great wonders of the modern world. Although the actress’s colourful language has been noted before, I somehow expected it to be a little like hearing one’s own mother swear. It’s not like that at all – it’s guttural. And it suits her.

Her contemporary Meryl Streep came under fire for insisting that not everyone within the close-knit Hollywood community knew about Weinstein’s alleged sexual assaults. But Mirren agrees with her. “Not everyone knew. Do you think Obama would have sent his daughter to intern with Harvey if it had been generally known? Absolutely not. But who did know? I guess that’s the point, that it happened behind closed doors, so those it happens to think they’re the only ones. And they stay silent.

Dec 08
2018

Today, a big new section has been launched – the press library. After 5 years and constantly forgetting that this crucial part is missing to the fansite, it’s finally here. Filled with 300 articles so far, you find magazine profiles, newspaper articles and interviews with Helen Mirren from as early as 1968, promoting her feature film debut in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” and “Age of Consent” to the most current interview promoting “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms”. Articles can be browsed by year, publication and even cover, as you will find extensive cover galleries for earch decade. While the press library sports a fair number of items, I’m sure there are many more articles out there, waiting to be added. So if you’re a fan, sitting on a stack of magazine articles you would like to share, please drop me a line. Enjoy browsing and reading.

Oct 26
2018

More magazine scans have been added to the photo gallery, as Helen graces the October issue of Fairlady Magazine (South Africa). They’ve missed their chance for a scoop on the upcoming “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms” but talk about beauty, entirely: “I’ve never felt beautiful and I’m objective enough to know that I don’t fit into that category. I’m not bad-looking, but I’m not beautiful”, she says, explaining that as an actress one becomes pragmatic about such things. “You don’t get cast for things, and then you see someone who does and she’s much prettier, but often not such a good actress, and you think: “Ah, okay, I get the picture.” No: for me, still now, it’s to do with wit and intelligence rather than the way I look. I don’t feel clever or funny enough.” Again, from the woman who upbraided Michael Parkinson for behaving like a “sexist old fart” after he interviewed her in 1975, this is unexpected. Many of the young women who Helen recently admitted to feeling in awe of – for the case with which they just say “f**k off” to men – would look up to her as precisely the kind of woman who can hold her own.