Nov 04
2019

To promote their new film, the actors took to the Broadway stage, and the cast turned their cheeky banter into an impromptu love song. “We are so outside of our comfort zones,” Helen Mirren was saying as she sat with Ian McKellen onstage at the Booth Theater on Sunday night. The two are no strangers to the New York stage; Mirren, 74, and McKellen, 80, played opposite each other in a Broadway production of “Dance of Death” in 2001. But this time, they were the surprise guests at “Freestyle Love Supreme,” the improvisational hip-hop comedy show that was co-created by Lin-Manuel Miranda. The esteemed British actors, co-stars in the forthcoming film “The Good Liar,” didn’t rap; instead, they were interviewed by the show’s M.C., Anthony Veneziale, about their personal and professional camaraderie, and the result was turned into an impromptu love song by the regular cast onstage. The fact that “Helen” and “McKellen” rhyme was not lost on the rappers. A complete bit on the evening can be read over at The New York Times, while pictures have been added to the photo gallery.


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Photo Gallery – Public Appearances – 2019 – “Freestyle Love Supreme” Broadway Visit
Oct 30
2019

Earlier today, Helen Mirren and Ian McKellen joined director Bill Conden and producer Greg Yolen at a photocall for “The Good Liar” on a London rooftop. Surely there will be some press junket interviews following soon. Pictures from the photocall have been added to the photo gallery.


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Photo Gallery – Public Appearances – 2019 – “The Good Liar” Photocall (London)

Oct 29
2019

The Good Liar, out November 8, is an onion of deception. Starring Sir Ian McKellen and Dame Helen Mirren as two widows with hidden agendas who meet each other online, each scene peels back another layer of lies; another elaborate moment of theatre. Almost every detail of the film is a spoiler. Adapted from the Nicholas Searle thriller of the same name, this exhilarating film is directed by Bill Condon, and Mirren and McKellen are joined by Years and Years star Russell Tovey and Downton Abbey’s Jim Carter. On Monday 28 October, an exclusive screening of The Good Liar was held in London, hosted by Mirren, McKellen, Tovey and Condon, who were also interviewed. Pictures from the premiere have been added to the photo gallery.


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Photo Gallery – Public Appearances – 2019 – “The Good Liar” Premiere (London)

Oct 19
2019

Also on Thursday, Helen Mirren was the star at the Los Angeles premiere for “Catherine the Great”. The many romances of Catherine the Great have been the stuff of legend for centuries, and after playing the famed 18th century Russian empress at the center of HBO’s miniseries Catherine the Great, Dame Helen Mirren says that like dating app users today, Catherine enjoyed swiping right. “I think she liked to have someone to laugh with, she liked to have someone to have dinner with — I think she would have been probably on Tinder in this day and age, as so many other people are,” Mirren told The Hollywood Reporter at the premiere of the four-hour mini, held appropriately at the antiquities-minded Hammer Museum in Los Angeles’ Westwood neighborhood. “So, yes, she liked men. Definitely. And she had a sexual life, as well as a political life. But as she said, ‘My problem is I love love too much. History’s always fantastic,” Mirren told THR. “When you play these historical characters and you start really looking at what they achieved in a day, it really takes your breath away. They almost seem to be superhuman.” Over 240 pictures from the premiere have been added to the photo gallery.


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Photo Gallery – Public Appearances – 2019 – “Catherine the Great” Premiere (Los Angeles)

Oct 15
2019

Helen Mirren is no stranger to playing powerful female rulers operating in the world of men. Her latest endeavor, Catherine the Great, is no different as she brings the story of the extraordinary 18th century Russian Empress to life in the upcoming HBO limited series. At the New Yorker festival screening of the first episode, Mirren was joined by co-star Jason Clarke, who plays Catherine’s military leader and lover Grigory Potemkin, for a Q&A moderated by Juilliard Drama Director Evan Yionoulis. While the four-part series charts Catherine’s shaky beginnings as a ruthless but progressive empress following a coup that overthrew her late husband, it equally follows Catherine’s passionate love affair with Potemkin and its sweeping impact on the Russian empire. Read on for four takeaways about the series, including its inspirations and some surprising similarities.

Unlike Catherine the Great when she took power, Helen Mirren has Russian roots.

While Catherine herself was Prussian-born, making the scope of her rule even more extraordinary, Mirren is Russian on her father’s side. Her paternal grandfather was a member of the Russian Imperial Army and her original family name was “Mironoff.” “I was made aware of Russian history by my grandfather when I was 7 or 8, listening to him tell stories of the dacha and where the horses were kept,” Mirren recalls. “And he’d tell of a sleigh ride that took four days from Moscow to our family estates in Russia.” These tales gave Mirren an early start, but it wasn’t until later in life when she began reading Russian history that she became specifically fascinated with Catherine the Great.

Catherine’s real-life letters were a valuable source of research for Mirren and Clarke.

Catherine and Potemkin’s correspondence, which still exists, proved to be a treasure trove of information about an era predating photos and videos. The letters of love and yearning when Potemkin was away at war fighting the Turks provided a script for Mirren and Clarke’s characters to follow. “They were so intimate, so sweet, but at the same time you could see their jealousy and their angst — you saw the whole relationship beautifully expressed in those letters,” Mirren said. “You could see the way he made her laugh, and her sexual obsession with him, but it was true love.” “You see in what they wrote that she was the center of his universe,” Clarke agreed. “He just couldn’t get enough of this woman on all different levels. Initially she was his teacher and educator; then he was her attack dog or war man. Their relationship was incredible, like nothing I’d ever read.”

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